Thursday, April 03, 2008

The first tribe of Eurasia?

Yerava:
Haplogroups****Percentage
C**************27
F**************44
H**************20
R1a1***********10
Cordaux et al. 2004

Around 90% of Eurasian male lineages are descendants of Y-Haplogroup F. Y-Haplogroup-CF line is supposedly migrated out of Africa and moved to India. If at all India is the original homeland that spanned rest of Eurasian clans then I believe the Yerava tribe could qualify for being the first tribe of Eurasian clans with such high frequencies F and C. The Yerava tribe is mostly found in southern Karnataka and northern Kerala belt and speak a language called Ravula.

However, if it turns out that all C's in India are in fact C5's then they might have migrated as part of multiple Indo-Turk migrations from Central Asia along with R1a1. Probably C5 and R1a1 were part of the first of Indo-Turk migrations to South Asia.

8 comments:

Maju said...

What about DE?

I don't think that yo could find the "parent" population today anymore: any reduced group should have seen its genetic heritage altered and homogeneized in so many milennia.

If instead of India strictu sensu, the branching out spot would have been in, say, southern Pakistan (closer to Arabia), I would expect them to have suffered several waves from outside: at least Neolithics, Indo-Europeans, Arabs... that would have drastically changed their dominant lineages, specialy the male ones.

And other migrations (added to the effects of drift) could have happened as well in the long Paleolithic milennia as well.

I would not expect the original "parent" tribe to have lived in any specially hidden place, but rather in the middle of all - being in consequence exposed to all sorts of back-migrations.

Anyhow, something interesting to chew on. Did you enjoy your mocha? :)

Manjunatha Mantampadi said...

What about DE?
Is there any population with both D and E lineages?

For the rest of your comment, I have this feeling that I follow Occam's razor and you anti-razor. I don't make many assumptions.

Did you enjoy your mocha? :)
How could I? That person removed the cream from the coffee and gave it to me.

Ibra said...

"Is there any population with both D and E lineages?"

There are rare cases of DE* in Nigeria. 65,000 years B.P. seems like a reasonable bound for the dispersal out of Africa due to the convergence of the African E and Asian D. A recent estimation of L3 puts it around 65,000 years B.P.too.

Manjunatha Mantampadi said...

Thanks, Ibra. It appears Geneticists are able to fit the timescales of both Y-chromosomes and mtDNAs nicely :-).

At present, only D clan looks like lone rangers, in my opinion.

Maju said...

Hi, I meant obviously D or E or both (DE could also be valid but unlikely).

I did not understand you mocha post, that's why I asked. In fact I had to look up what the heck is a mocha (it seems it was me who was lost in translation). Sorry that guy was so nasty.

Btw, hi Ibra. :)

Ibra said...

Hey Maju it's been while good to hear from you. :P

Anonymous said...

“Thanks, Ibra. It appears Geneticists are able to fit the timescales of both Y-chromosomes and mtDNAs nicely.”


The mtDNA and Y chromosome dates line up quiet well; roughly the new mtDNA dates are 3/4*the old mtDNA dates. But I wonder if those dates are within range of the archeological dates. The pre Toba archaeological layer at Jwalapuram (affinities to African Middle Stone Age traditions) starts from at least 77,000 year B.P. and continues even after the eruption.

Manjunat said...

I did not understand you mocha post, that's why I asked. In fact I had to look up what the heck is a mocha (it seems it was me who was lost in translation). Sorry that guy was so nasty.

When the guy asked whether I wanted cream I thought he might be offering some add-ons and I would have to pay. I wasn't very keen on going back to counter and paying additional amount. So I declined. But it looked stupid when he removed the cream that he had already added.